partybarackisinthehousetonight:

never let your printer know that you waited until the last minute to print something and you’re in a hurry. they can sense fear

(via sunshineteaandladies)

tastefullyoffensive:

Be nice to Frank.

[caboosium]

(via jedi-superman)

deycallmetrey:

I’m so weak rn

(Source: gaymerzone, via jedi-superman)

Timestamp: 1413938613

deycallmetrey:

I’m so weak rn

(Source: gaymerzone, via jedi-superman)

iguanamouth:

she just stood there dong this little dance until we got up

(via screamingorgasms)

Timestamp: 1413937841

iguanamouth:

she just stood there dong this little dance until we got up

(via screamingorgasms)

sharonosbourne:

I have never related to anyone more than I relate to the woman on the left right now

(via rumbox)

(Source: l0vetoburn, via dizzydream-err)

despitetheanger:

HOW COOL IS THIS?!?

I took my male tiger het amel retic Caesar to the vet today; as he had a slight prolapse and was a lil constipated last week. It’s all completely cleared and he’s fine. They were really impressed with his health!

The vets emailed me the x-ray. :3

(via heckyeahreptiles)

Timestamp: 1413937177

despitetheanger:

HOW COOL IS THIS?!?

I took my male tiger het amel retic Caesar to the vet today; as he had a slight prolapse and was a lil constipated last week. It’s all completely cleared and he’s fine. They were really impressed with his health!

The vets emailed me the x-ray. :3

(via heckyeahreptiles)

(Source: traumaauction, via foxytoes)

amnhnyc:

Lonesome George, the Galapagos tortoise who was the last of his kind, is on view at the Museum through January 4, 2015. Below is a quick rundown of everything you need to know about Lonesome George.

Species: Last documented member of Chelonoidis abingdoni, native to Pinta Island

Age: Thought to be more than 100 years old

Diet: Cactus, shrubs, grasses, and broad-leaved plants

Turtle vs. tortoise? Tortoises are turtles that live exclusively on land.

Did you know? Lonesome George—the lone tortoise of his species for at least 40 years—was named after a famous 1950s American TV comedian, George Gobel, who called himself “Lonesome George.”

Notable traits: An extremely long neck and a “saddle-backed” shell that rises slightly in front, like a saddle

Weight: About 165 lbs (75 kg); males of various species of Galapagos tortoises can exceed 660 lbs (300 kg) and are the largest living tortoises

Discovery: In 1971, a Hungarian scientist spotted Lonesome George on Pinta Island. The discovery surprised researchers who thought Pinta Island tortoises were already extinct. A year later, George was taken to the Tortoise Breeding and Rearing Center on Santa Cruz Island, where he lived for the next 40 years. 

Saving Lonesome George: Staff at the Galapagos National Park and Charles Darwin Research Station tried repeatedly to mate Lonesome George with females from closely related species. Those efforts failed, but a new strategy to revive the species is underway. The discovery of hybrid tortoises partially descended from Pinta Island tortoises on Isabela Island, where whalers or pirates likely moved them long ago, provides the opportunity for establishing a breeding colony whose young will initiate the recovery of a reproductive population on Pinta.

Can’t get enough Lonesome George info? Head to the Museum’s website for more.

(via dont-panic-zoology)

Timestamp: 1413894326

amnhnyc:

Lonesome George, the Galapagos tortoise who was the last of his kind, is on view at the Museum through January 4, 2015. Below is a quick rundown of everything you need to know about Lonesome George.

Species: Last documented member of Chelonoidis abingdoni, native to Pinta Island

Age: Thought to be more than 100 years old

Diet: Cactus, shrubs, grasses, and broad-leaved plants

Turtle vs. tortoise? Tortoises are turtles that live exclusively on land.

Did you know? Lonesome George—the lone tortoise of his species for at least 40 years—was named after a famous 1950s American TV comedian, George Gobel, who called himself “Lonesome George.”

Notable traits: An extremely long neck and a “saddle-backed” shell that rises slightly in front, like a saddle

Weight: About 165 lbs (75 kg); males of various species of Galapagos tortoises can exceed 660 lbs (300 kg) and are the largest living tortoises

Discovery: In 1971, a Hungarian scientist spotted Lonesome George on Pinta Island. The discovery surprised researchers who thought Pinta Island tortoises were already extinct. A year later, George was taken to the Tortoise Breeding and Rearing Center on Santa Cruz Island, where he lived for the next 40 years. 

Saving Lonesome George: Staff at the Galapagos National Park and Charles Darwin Research Station tried repeatedly to mate Lonesome George with females from closely related species. Those efforts failed, but a new strategy to revive the species is underway. The discovery of hybrid tortoises partially descended from Pinta Island tortoises on Isabela Island, where whalers or pirates likely moved them long ago, provides the opportunity for establishing a breeding colony whose young will initiate the recovery of a reproductive population on Pinta.

Can’t get enough Lonesome George info? Head to the Museum’s website for more.

(via dont-panic-zoology)

libutron:

Ocellate River Stingray - Potamotrygon motoro

Potamotrygon motor (Rajiformes - Potamotrygonidae) is a species of freshwater stingray endemic to, and widespread throughout, several South American river systems.

These stingrays can be distinguished from closely related species by the presence of orange to yellow dorsal eyespots, each surrounded by a black ring, with diameters larger than the eyes. Body color is otherwise greyish-brown. They are oval in shape with a robust tail, bearing a venomous spine. Maximum total length has been reported at 100 centimeters and maximum weight at 15 kg, though individuals tend to be much smaller.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Jason Hering | Locality: Cuiaba river, Matto Grosso, Amazon, Brazil - captive (2008)

(via cyan-biologist)

Timestamp: 1413825408

libutron:

Ocellate River Stingray - Potamotrygon motoro

Potamotrygon motor (Rajiformes - Potamotrygonidae) is a species of freshwater stingray endemic to, and widespread throughout, several South American river systems.

These stingrays can be distinguished from closely related species by the presence of orange to yellow dorsal eyespots, each surrounded by a black ring, with diameters larger than the eyes. Body color is otherwise greyish-brown. They are oval in shape with a robust tail, bearing a venomous spine. Maximum total length has been reported at 100 centimeters and maximum weight at 15 kg, though individuals tend to be much smaller.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Jason Hering | Locality: Cuiaba river, Matto Grosso, Amazon, Brazil - captive (2008)

(via cyan-biologist)

colonelcheru:

literatenonsense:

my-bff-nastia:

gymnastics-dreamscancometrue:

The bee attack in photos x

SCREAMING. I love Larissa casually being like look friend, a bee is upon you. EITHER THAT OR SHE IS PUTTING IT THERE. She and Russia are in cahoots.

DYING

I didn’t realize there was a bee and it made these pictures 100000 times better.

(via shes-elecktric)

Timestamp: 1413825391

colonelcheru:

literatenonsense:

my-bff-nastia:

gymnastics-dreamscancometrue:

The bee attack in photos x

SCREAMING. I love Larissa casually being like look friend, a bee is upon you. EITHER THAT OR SHE IS PUTTING IT THERE. She and Russia are in cahoots.

DYING

I didn’t realize there was a bee and it made these pictures 100000 times better.

(via shes-elecktric)

partybarackisinthehousetonight:

*releases pack of dads into home depot* go……be free

(via uncertaintlycertain)